How do the water challenges of ancient Israel compare to water challenges you might face in your home region?

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    • #95336674
      Mark
      Participant

      Water is an unlimited resource if it cannot be capture and stored to sustain life.

    • #95335063
      Tonya
      Participant

      There is very few water challenges in my home region other than if there is insufficient rain then certain water restriction protocols may be put in place such as watering your yard.

    • #95319273
      Carolyn
      Participant

      In New York, I don’t have to think about my water supply. It comes and I can drink it straight from the tap. I believe the majority of our water supply is sourced from Frost Valley’s Neversink River. In ancient Israel, rains were the primary source of water. However, rains were seasonal and varied by region. Not all the rain that fell was usable, as some was lost to runoff and evaporation. They had to develop various technologies to make use of the water, i.e. cisterns, wells, aqueducts and tunnels.

    • #95314018
      John
      Participant

      I was struck with the similarity of the rainfall calendar between Israel and Southern California.

    • #95310072
      Terry
      Participant

      I don’t have any real water challenges myself however the farmers around where I live sometimes have challenges with water if it doesn’t rain enough but even then many of them have ponds and the equipment to irrigate a lot of their crops

    • #95308652
      Kathleen
      Participant

      Rainfall is still limited by season; it is still limited by region. It is still subject to runoff and evaporation; and droughts are still part of our ecosystem.

      The difference is that our availability to clean water is constant. In general, in our normal everyday lives, we don’t worry about whether we have clean water to drink, bathe, or wash our clothes. We stock up on bottled water in case of emergencies. We are fortunate that we have aqueducts and tunnels throughout our cities that fill giant water towers as a way to preserve the winter rains for summer use.

      I never gave much thought to my personal water supply before this lesson. I certainly didn’t have “the image of water as something so precious that it’s likened to the very gospel message itself.”

    • #95304486
      Ken
      Participant

      In these modern times, if we have a shortage of rainfall for any period of time, we are ask to limit our consumption by the powers that be so that we can have enough water for the most people even though it is less. In ancient times, there were not governing powers to stop the people from using their water supply and not share it with others.

    • #95301762
      Terry
      Participant

      Living in Florida the sin problem with water supply is hurricane season where our water source might get compromised. And to compensate for that we keep lots of bottled water stored

    • #95300546
      Patricia
      Participant

      In my home area we are very blessed to have an abundance of water and easy access to it.

    • #95299541
      Marci
      Participant

      The water challenges of ancient Israel can’t really be compared. It seems that the Israelites were concerned about water everyday, sometimes multiple times a day. We are blessed to have faucets with running water, refrigerators with filtered water, drinking fountains and even sprinkler systems to water our lawns.

    • #95288988
      Tuyen
      Participant

      As I am writing the answer for this question, it rains so much out side. Delaware has about 45 inches of water per year, which is much more than the average of 21 inches per year. However, rain is evenly distributed in Delaware, so we do not have the wilderness scenario as Israel does. We do not have to worry about water availability daily. Besides almost everyone have water piped into the house. only a small population uses water well. However, the artesian water in our area has too much iron, so we have to use an ion exchange system to make the water safe to drink. I think water in Israel is pure, so they don’t have the quality issue.

    • #95280028
      Pauline
      Participant

      I basically don’t have water issues that require me to be daily thinking about how I obtain my water. Water is supplied into my home for drinking, washing and cooking. In very hot summers (in London) we are asked not to use garden hoses. Mostly, water is very easy where I am, so I should learn to appreciate that more compared to how it was even a couple of hundred years ago in this country and of course for Israelites in the Promised Land.

    • #95278036
      Cheryl
      Participant

      We are blessed to be surrounded by fresh water lakes. Water is readily available. However, droughts do affect us. Lack of rain limits our use of outside water. Nothing that I’ve experienced can compare to what the ancient Israelites or modern day Israelis experience today.

    • #125642
      Chia
      Participant

      The annual rainfall in Israel is low and is also limited by region and season. I live in North Borneo, a tropical country, and receive high yearly rainfall, especially during the wet season. Occasionally, we may experience a dry spell caused by the El Niño effect.

    • #94291
      Our Daily Bread
      Keymaster
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