Which piece of historical information presented in this lecture did you find most interesting? Why?

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    • #95303508
      Donald
      Participant

      The idea that the fortress was defended by fewer soldiers than most of us in the present day would imagine. Jericho’s defenders would have numbered in the low hundreds instead of 1000’s. I did like Professor Hess’ spiritual applications to the battle. This was in essence, God’s display of might and a stamp of approval of Joshua’s position and leadership.

    • #95301343
      Patricia
      Participant

      The small amount of soldiers that are thought to have been in Jericho in Joshua’s time.

    • #95299953
      James E.
      Participant

      What I found most interesting in this lecture were several things. First the term King and the way it was used in those days. Second, that Pharoah of Egypt was so closely tied to these other places such as Jericho, Jerusalem, Tel Hazor, etc. And third how despite the destruction of Jericho by Joshua and the Israelites, God is shown as a merciful God in the way that He saved Rahab and her family from destruction. The entire lecture was very interesting as well as educational.

    • #95297219
      Lavonda
      Participant

      ryhab and gods mercy

    • #95289358
      Diana
      Participant

      the salvation of rahab and her family…it shows the mercy that our God displayed.

    • #95287808
      Larry
      Participant

      The size of the Army at Jericho, and how small it was. I had always thought about a large Army of thousands. Not only the size of the Army in Jericho, but other cities, how small they were.

    • #125193
      Patricia
      Participant

      Dr. Hess’ explication of the term “melek” highlights for me the difficulty of assuming that terms from one language or era have direct equivalents in another language or era. In doing translation from one modern language to another, I have found that “literal” translations all too often miss social/cultural implications in either language. Languages are nuanced and we need to study those nuances in order to make well-informed assumptions about the meaning of ancient words/ titles.

    • #94384
      Our Daily Bread
      Keymaster
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